9 November, 2009

Newsletter & Christmas Gifts

The November newsletter for Friends of Fusi School is now available.

You may read it at
http://www.fusischool.org/newsletters/November2009.pdf.

Or you can find it on the Newsletters page at our web site
www.FusiSchool.org

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Unsure what to get people who have everything?

Why not make a donation to Ha Fusi School on behalf of your loved ones,
giving them the knowledge that they have contributed to the provision of
education in Lesotho.

There is a range of options available, depending upon your budget:

For £9 you can buy enough chalk for a term
For £18 you can buy a year’s text books for a student
For £25 you can buy a desk
For £33 you can pay fees for a year

If you are interested in this,
please contact Andrew Uglow
at andy_uglow@hotmail.com
detailing which package you would like to buy
and an address to which an acknowledgement card can be sent, along with
a cheque.

Remember that donations can be gift aided, so please include a slip giving us your home address and permission to claim the extra 28p in each pound.

All money that is donated will go to Ha Fusi School – there are no administration costs.

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Scanner

David writes:

Can you imagine a school taking its exam papers around to the corner newsagent to run off copies – and paying newsagent prices?  That’s essentially the position Fusi school was in at the beginning of the year.  But we’ve been working at reducing the costs.

When our laser printer arrived from England, courtesy of the Durham Link container, it made a big difference.  I’ve been typing up most of the exam papers on our computer and printing them off.  Maths equations are no problem – but science and other diagrams defeated my freehand drawing skills with a mouse.

Fortunately, an Irish charity that ships computers for schools into Lesotho is based in Teyateyaneng, so we approached them to get a scanner for the school.  They make a charge and Elizabeth spent some time haggling the price down.  The next challenge was finding one that worked: the special cables needed for the two scanners they had were missing.  But thanks to the perseverance of Brice, a local Peace Corps volunteer, a printer/copier/scanner was found hiding in the corner of their workroom.  That’s now up and running and the science papers for the end of year exams look a treat.